'Representing the DeafBlind Community in Victoria'

Posts tagged ‘braille’

Deafblind tips #4: braille labels

Hello! Another deafblind tips is “Braille labelling”. Many years ago I was taught how to use the tool called a braille writing slate with stylus. I write by stamping any words in braille onto dymo tape then stick the label on any items. See video link to show you how to use the dymo tape tool that you can put labels on any things Whatever you want to. Also you could buy this tool from your NDIS funds.

See photos of labels, for example of herb spice, DVD, container.

Time for a joke. Golfie is my white cane. He is proud to show his braille label ‘Golfie’ because he is often taken mistakenly by other deafblind people. See photo or video. 

Heather Lawson – dbvheather@gmail.com

Video showing how to use a braille slate with dymo tape
Heather signs in Auslan about her white cane “Golfie” and why she labels him with braille dymo tape!

New resource for blind and deafblind women: ‘Our Right to Safety and Respect’

In 2018, Women With Disabilities Victoria (WDV) developed a guide about violence, abuse, safety and respect. The guide was made by and for women with disabilities. Versions were made in plain English, Easy English and Auslan.

WDV saw that the resources may not be accessible to women who are blind or deafblind. These women already face barriers accessing support services and information when experiencing intimate partner violence or other forms of violence.

WDV recently adapted the resources and produced new versions in braille (grades 1 & 2), audio and audio-described video. Deafblind Victoria consulted with WDV on braille versions of the guide. The new resources were released on 2 July 2020. Deafblind Victoria is proud to support this project and its contribution to the safety of women in the Deafblind community.

Guide to Zoom meetings for Deafblind braille users

Health advice during the Covid-19 pandemic includes keeping physical distance from others. This can be challenging for Deafblind people who rely on touch for communication. Some DBV members have been exploring if the popular Zoom videoconferencing service can offer anything to Deafblind people.

Although Zoom is mainly for live video and audio, it also supports live text chat, which can be accessed on a braille display. A live captioning service can be paired with Zoom, so words spoken in a meeting can also appear as text. Note that live captions require fast braille reading – the average speed of spoken English is about 150 words per minute. However, if a meeting is moderated well, we found it to be a good option for some.

DBV’s Michelle Stevens has drafted a document for braille users who want to try Zoom – click here to download it. Please get in touch with DBV to give feedback, or to discuss details about how we used Zoom, live captions and braille.