'Representing the Deafblind Community in Victoria'

Posts from the ‘deafblind tips’ category

DeafBlind tips #6: QR code cards by Heather Lawson

Photo description: Laminated white card with large black print that says “I am deafblind. I can’t photo QR code. Please add my details to the written list: Mary Poppins, M:0394838171 sms only”

I created the card called QR code card. I tested it by showing staff who work in shops, café, supermarket. They took the card from me for them to read while writing in the QR book or typing on QR device for me and gave the card back to me. I know they did it.

Why I use the QR code card? I am blind. I cannot see where the QR screen are at any shops so I can’t scan it by my iPhone. Only way I could try at the shop counters showing the lamination card I keep in my bag or coat pocket.

I feel more in control to use the QR card. No matter if I go out with Commguides or friends or on my own. I have the control to do this independently.

You may want to try yourself in different ways of communication needs. It depends if you have or not have the iPhone or your iPhone may not work well. It’s best to have back up  to use card. I have the message in my iPhone voice mail saying

“hello Heather here. I am deafblind, I can’t hear you talking on the phone so please SMS me and I can read your text  by using my braille device thank you”

See photo and text description of a sample of QR code card to the right hand side of text:

Here is a short video of Heather demonstrating how to use the QR card in a Melbourne café.

By Heather Lawson – email: dbvheather@gmail.com

Deafblind tips #5: Raised dots and braille labels for appliances

For many years I have used a microwave oven to cook or heat up food. I stick raised dots on to the screen of the microwave on top of the stop and start button. This helps me to feel which dots to press for restart or to stop cooking. Also when travelling anywhere and staying at any accommodation such as motel, hotel or at friends, where there are no raised dots, I find ways to be independent. I bring my own blue tack and make small dots to stick on temporarily. It works well. Your choice whether you prefer to have raised dot or braille labels for your microwave oven. You can buy raised dots or braille labels from the Vision Australia shop through your NDIS funds.

Heather Lawson – dbvheather@gmail.com

Deafblind tips #4: braille labels

Hello! Another deafblind tips is “Braille labelling”. Many years ago I was taught how to use the tool called a braille writing slate with stylus. I write by stamping any words in braille onto dymo tape then stick the label on any items. See video link to show you how to use the dymo tape tool that you can put labels on any things Whatever you want to. Also you could buy this tool from your NDIS funds.

See photos of labels, for example of herb spice, DVD, container.

Time for a joke. Golfie is my white cane. He is proud to show his braille label ‘Golfie’ because he is often taken mistakenly by other deafblind people. See photo or video. 

Heather Lawson – dbvheather@gmail.com

Video showing how to use a braille slate with dymo tape
Heather signs in Auslan about her white cane “Golfie” and why she labels him with braille dymo tape!

Deafblind tips #3: Carton flaps

Heather Lawson, dbvheather@gmail.com

Hey everyone. Another deafblind tip to share. When I go shopping, I like to buy milk and juice but all in the same style of carton. They are all in same sizes, very tricky to know which one. Now how I do this? Before putting cartons in supermarket trolley or in the pantry, I have to break one side flap of a carton for soy milk, break two side flaps for juice and the carton of almond milk with no breaking flaps. It helps me to feel the flaps when I need to. Question: Which carton is Deaf and have no ears?

Auslan video of Deafblind Tips 3 – Cartons