'Representing the Deafblind Community in Victoria'

Posts from the ‘consulting’ category

Deafblind Café – public transport accessibility reforms

At Deafblind Café on 20th July 2022, we talked about public transport and celebrated Christmas in July.

Maddie Chandler talks with Michelle Stevens about train access

The federal government plans to change the Disability Transport Standards. Maddie Chandler visited DBV from Canberra to find out more about Deafblind Victorians’ experiences with trains, trams, buses and taxis, so the government can make better rules about accessibility.

DBV members talked about problems we have with transport:

  • We memorise routes (how many stops, how to get from the platform to the exit, etc.) It’s difficult when things change
  • Announcements are not audible, signs are not visible, and asking for help is difficult with communication barriers
  • Staff can be unhelpful and hostile, and rules are inconsistent
  • Passengers rush in at stops before we can get off
  • Gaps, uneven platforms

And possible solutions:

  • Travel training for Deafblind people; learning the layout of stations
  • Deafblind Awareness training for transport staff
  • Signs with black backgrounds, and lower or closer to the ground
  • In Singapore and Japan, there are designated zones around train doors that passengers must stand behind, and glass doors to prevent tripping at the edge of the platform
  • Braille and tactile information at train stations

For more information about the Transport Standards, including how you can have your say about the changes, visit www.infrastructure.gov.au/transportaccessibility.

We celebrated Christmas in July with a Secret Santa and a prize for best festive hat, won by Jasper Cleland.

Click for photo gallery

Tactile maps research

Leona and Ruth from Monash University testing 3D printed building models with Heather Lawson & interpreters

Researchers from Monash University are testing 3D printed models with blind and deafblind people. These models show the layout of rooms in a building, including the location of walls, stairs, toilets, shops and more. They can show different floors of the same building. The researchers, Ruth and Leona, visited DBV yesterday to test the models with DBV members. We think it’s a great idea and we hope to see tactile models of buildings in future! It might help us find our way around independently.

For more information on the study and to register your interest, please visit: https://forms.gle/fFvvUFRcztUJa7cE9.  

Contact Ruth.Nagassa@monash.edu if you have any questions.